Big difference in output levels with different effects

I’m noticing big differences in output levels on my Organelle M while using different effects patches. Using rags_reverb, the output level is pretty close to the input level. Several effect patches produce almost no output. I was just trying uneventide and I’m getting almost nothing on the output. Wondering if I’m doing something wrong, there’s an issue wit the “M”, or if it’s in the patch programming?

Do you think its input levels?
( does it seem to be happening in synths?)

If it’s working ok on one patch , then I suspect it’s patch related. ( unless something going on frequency related?)

If its patch related probably needs to be looked at, on a patch by patch basis.

Can you name a C&G patch that you notice this on, one that’s ok - then I can compare the pair of them on the organelle-1 and organelle-m, and see if they seem to behave differently.

The input levels are fine. I’ve been sending the output of the Arturia Microfreak to the Organelle M. Maybe you could try it with the uneventide patch? https://patchstorage.com/uneventide/

sorry, no I didn’t mean the source of the sound, I meant do you think its something to do with how the Organelle is dealing with the input level e.g. less gain of the input? rather than its output gain
(which we would also see on synths)

if it’s specific to a patch, then sounds like it’s some thing quirky with that patch.
(gain on both input and output are very much patch specific… its why I have so many places in orac to allow you to alter the gain levels! )

sorry, I only really know my patches and the C&G patches, so I’d take a look at those - for others its best to talk to the developer… see if they can figure out whats going on, and fix if needed.

I haven’t found any factory Organelle Patches that have problem with either input or output. Just 3rd party patches. I’ll contact the authors as I find them.

1 Like

You could actually try doing this yourself in Pd.

  1. Figure out a target dB output for all the patches in question with the same input being fed in. Use something to measure this, even if its just the monitoring lights on a mixer or your DAW.
  2. In each patch file, right in between the outR outL objects (these represent the main outputs) and what ever they are connected to - throw an object [*0.99] (or lower) to decrease volume or [*1.01] (or higher) to increase volume. One object for each output. Connect to the left input on the object. Make sure they are connected just the same as they were before, but bridged by your new *# objects.
  3. Experiment using trial and error until you find the sweet spot for each patch.

Could be a very rewarding and encouraging first foray into PD! It’s not as tough as you might think, just time consuming once things get more complicated.

Remember to share the results and keep in touch! Please other people pitch in if i missed something :slight_smile:

1 Like

Just wanted to add that I am experiencing similar behavior with some 3rd party patches and my new Organelle M. All of thetechnobear’s effects patches work flawlessly, but a handful of 3rd party delays and reverbs have greatly diminished audio output in comparison, after testing with identical levels of the same, looping input. One of the stock patches that also exhibits this behavior is QuadDelay.

I tried my hand at Wannop’s [*~#] suggestion in pd, and while the audio did get louder, it also became extremely tinny, and added quite a bit of hiss to the output. Anyone have any other ideas, or better yet, a guess at what might be happening in the patches? I’d hate to send patch writers back to the drawing board, and would be fine with correcting whatever is awry with the signal myself.

impossible to know without going threw a particular patch in detail to look at how its coded…

but it sounds in this particular case its frequency related - so loosing the bass end somewhere along the signal chain, so when you amp it, you’re just amp’ing the noise in the original source.

ideally the solution is to look at the patch, and see whats happening…

perhaps the other option in this case, might be to amplify the signal, and then use a low pass filter, to take the top end down a bit.